Release date: October 2020

Get Peachy Challenge

Type: Booty, Abs, Full Body

Equipment: Fitness Mat, Dumbells (Optional), Resistance Bands (Optional)

30-40 min

Per day

28 Days

Program



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  • DAY 1

    3 workouts | 5 exercises, 3 sets each

    DAY 2

    4 workouts | 25 min (in total)

    DAY 3

    3 workouts | 5 exercises, 3 sets each

    DAY 4

    4 workouts | 25 min (in total)

    DAY 5

    3 workouts | 5 exercises, 3 sets each

    DAY 6

    3 workouts | 10 min (in total)

    DAY 7

    ACTIVE REST DAY

    DAY 8

    3 workouts | 5 exercises, 3 sets each

    DAY 9

    4 workouts | 25 min (in total)

    DAY 10

    3 workouts | 5 exercises, 3 sets each

    DAY 11

    4 workouts | 25 min (in total)

    DAY 12

    3 workouts | 5 exercises, 3 sets each

    DAY 13

    3 workouts | 10 min (in total)

    DAY 14

    ACTIVE REST DAY

    DAY 15

    3 workouts | 5 exercises, 3 sets each

    DAY 16

    4 workouts | 25 min (in total)

    DAY 17

    3 workouts | 5 exercises, 3 sets each

    DAY 18

    4 workouts | 25 min (in total)

    DAY 19

    3 workouts | 5 exercises, 3 sets each

    DAY 20

    4 workouts | 20 min (in total)

    DAY 21

    ACTIVE REST DAY

    DAY 22

    3 workouts | 5 exercises, 3 sets each

    DAY 23

    4 workouts | 25 min (in total)

    DAY 24

    3 workouts | 5 exercises, 3 sets each

    DAY 25

    4 workouts | 25 min (in total)

    DAY 26

    ACTIVE REST DAY

    DAY 27

    3 workouts | 5 exercises, 3 sets each

    DAY 28

    4 workouts | 25 min (in total)

    Show All

    FAQ

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    Who is 'The Glute Guy', Bret Contreras?

    Bret Contreras ( https://bretcontreras.com/ ) is considered to be the world’s foremost expert on glute training. He has a PhD in Sports science, and is the author of Glute Lab, Strong Curves and Bodyweight Strength Training Anatomy.

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    What equipment do I need?

    You will need a set of dumbbells (or a few sets for progression), a set of resistance bands (with various levels of resistance for progression), and a bench (or a couch/stool/something sturdy).

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    Can I do this workout with just bodyweight?

    Yes you can. It is recommended for beginners, or anyone that's new to training their lower body and glutes, to start with bodyweight. It is important to get the foundation right before loading on weights to avoid risk of injury. It is also important to learn to activate the right muscles and doing it in a full range of motion before adding weights.

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    What is the right weight to use?

    The weight should be challenging enough so that you need to WORK and struggle for the last few reps, while still maintaining good form. Everyone will be different - use a weight which suits you, do not follow someone's else’s weights.

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    What are some ways we can increase intensity without increasing weight?

    You can increase it by:

    • Increasing sets
    • Increasing reps
    • Decreasing rest time in between sets
    • Increasing training frequency
    • And if you have the option to increase weight, then increase weight!
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    Can I do this program with another weight loss program?

    No. It is recommended to do one program at a time. Combining two can be counterproductive and may cause unnecessary stress (or even injury) to your body.

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    I can't activate my glutes during the main workout. What exercises can i do to help with that?

    Some people may have difficulty activating their glutes. You may try some of these warm up glute activation exercises. Choose 3-5 exercises below as part of your glute activation warm up exercises if necessary. Do not overdo it as you don't want to fatigue your muscles before the main workout.

    1. Standing Glute Squeeze. Squeeze and hold for 3 seconds then repeat 10 times. Rest for 3-5 seconds in between sets.
    2. Side Lying Clams. Do 1 or 2 sets of 10-20 reps. Use light resistance band if preferred.
    3. Banded Glute Bridge. Do 1 or 2 sets of 10-15 reps. Use light resistance band and can also add abduction when hips are raised.
    4. Frog Pump. Do 1 or 2 sets of 10-15 reps.
    5. Reverse Lunge. Do 1 set of 10 reps on each leg.
    6. Lateral Bank Walk. Do 1 set of 10-20 reps on each side.
    7. Squat. Do 1 set of 10 reps. You can also use light resistance band for extra glute activation.
    8. Donkey Kicks. Do 1 or 2 sets of 10-20 reps. Use light resistance band if preferred.
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    One side of my glutes is bigger than the other, what should i do?

    Muscle imbalance drills that you can try (based on Bret - see more https://bretcontreras.com/how-to-fix-glute-imbalances/ )

    1. Contractions on weaker glutes.
      10 sets of 3-second maximum contractions with the weaker glute from a standing position
      10 sets of 3-second maximum contractions with the weaker glute from a seated position
      10 sets of 3-second maximum contractions with the weaker glute from a prone position
      Rest 5 seconds in between isoholds
    2. Low Load Drills on weaker Glutes
      2 sets of 10-20 reps of side lying abductions with the weaker leg
      2 sets of 10-20 reps of side lying clams with the weaker leg
      2 sets of 10-20 reps of quadruped hip extensions with the weaker leg
      2 sets of 10-20 reps of single leg glute bridges with the weaker leg
      Rest 30 seconds between sets
    3. Perform the exercises in circuit fashion; first the abduction, then the clam, then the quadruped, then the bridge, then repeat. Don’t do any of these drills for the stronger leg/glute and don't use resistance bands or ankle weights.

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    In order to grow my glutes, is it necessary to be in a caloric surplus?

    It will be beneficial.

    Eating at a caloric surplus while following this program may result in the following:

    • An increase in scale weight
    • Larger increase in glutes
    • A slight decrease/no difference/increase in fat
    • Increase in body volume; and
    • Dramatically increased strength

    Eating at a caloric maintenance while following this program may result in the following:

    • No change in scale weight
    • Increased shape in key areas such as glutes
    • Decreased fat
    • Decrease in body volume (since muscle takes up 20% less space than fat at equal masses); and
    • Increased strength
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    I want my butt to get smaller, not larger. What should I do?

    Diet makes the difference. The training stays the same. The training methods that cause your muscles to grow during a caloric surplus are the training methods that cause you to retain/hold onto your muscles during a caloric deficit.

    Eating at a caloric maintenance while following this program may result in the following:

    • No change in scale weight
    • Increased shape in key areas such as glutes
    • Decreased fat
    • Decrease in body volume (since muscle takes up 20% less space than fat at equal masses); and
    • Increased strength

    Eating at a caloric deficit while following this program may result in the following:

    • A decrease in scale weight
    • Maintenance of shape in key areas such as glutes
    • Decreased fat
    • Decrease in body volume

    Eating at a caloric surplus while following this program may result in the following:

    • An increase in scale weight
    • Larger increase in glutes
    • A slight decrease/no difference/increase in fat
    • Increase in body volume; and
    • Dramatically increased strength
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    Why are there so many reps and sets in this video?

    Structured progressive resistance training programs using multiple sets and reps help to increase muscular hypertrophy (muscle growth). Adding more sets, reps or intensity can create metabolic stress and muscular tension to the worked muscle groups. Some muscular damage may occur if you're new to working out, new to the exercises, or due to high volume training.

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    What is progressive overload?

    Progressive overload involves continually increasing the demands on the musculoskeletal system to continually make gains in muscle size, strength, and endurance. Training programs need to be progressed with higher volumes (more sets, reps, frequency and intensity) to force muscles to regenerate their cellular makeup and produce increased size.

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    Why are we taking 90-120 seconds rest in between exercises?

    The recommended rest time between sets is about 90 seconds. It is important to rest your muscles before doing the next set as you want to make sure to do it in good form, and to avoid injury. If you preferred shorter rest time of 60 seconds, it is okay too as long as you are NOT compromising your form.

    While resting, your body recovers adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatine (PC), which are the primary sources of fuel your body uses for short, but intense, bouts of muscle contraction (like when you are lifting weights). Resting for 60 seconds will allow approximately 85 to 90% recovery of ATP and PC, while resting a bit longer will replenish more. It takes about 3 mins to replenish approximately 100% of ATP and PC.

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    What is the purpose of doing repeated sets of the same exercise?

    Repeating the same exercise helps is to increase the total volume of tension which can assist in muscle growth. There are a few factors when it comes to muscle growth: metabolic stress, mechanical tension or muscular damage. Doing multiple sets of the same exercise may help in promoting some of these factors.

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    What is the difference between a compound exercise and isolated exercise?

    A compound exercise uses multiple muscle groups and joints at the same time and an isolated exercise is targeted and works one joint and one specific group of muscles.

    Squatting is a compound exercise as it works your hamstring, quads, glutes, calves and core muscles. It also requires the use of multiple major joint regions including ankle (into ankle dorsiflexion as you squat down), your knee joint (not caved in), your lumbo-pelvic-hip-complex (not arched and rounded). Your shoulder joint (chest tall and not rounded shoulders) and head & neck (neutral, looking forward).

    Bicep curls are an isolated exercise as it works mostly your bicep muscle fibres and uses primarily the elbow joint.

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    Is feeling sore in the glutes a good indicator that they are growing?

    It is a sign that you have caused muscular damage to your glutes. If you eat sufficient calories (i.e. in surplus) with a balanced diet, you will be able to rebuild the damaged muscle fibres, making them slightly stronger (and bigger over time) to handle more demanding workouts.

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    Why is my butt not sore?

    Soreness is a decent indicator of muscle damage, but muscle damage is just one of three primary mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy.

    There are more to building strength and muscle mass. Some soreness is good, but the law of diminishing returns applies. Excessive soreness prevents you from achieving quality workouts on subsequent days. If you perform full body training sessions several times per week, then soreness will prevent you from gaining strength. Building a stronger body over time should be the long-term goal, not crippling yourself so that you can barely move the following day.

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    Why is my butt not growing?

    Consistency is important. Muscle adaptations begin immediately in response to resistance training, but it may take a while before you can actually see results - it is not going to happen overnight or within 30 days. Research shows that some people may see a visible growth in muscles within 4-8 weeks of resistance training (the process begins in the early stages of training). It also depends on what results you’re expecting to see – if you’re expecting a big change, it is going to take longer to achieve.

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    Why am I not seeing results?

    Two weeks or even two months is a short period of time, and changes come at different speeds for different people - some may see results faster and some slower. Additionally, there is really no such thing as "quick results" and attempts at trying to do so may hinder your progress. Rather than focusing on short-term results, it is important to stay generally consistent with new habits you're forming. Over-exercising and under-eating are not often discussed but are often the reason why progress stalls - remember, we want to find sustainability in our habits.

    Other factors which may impact your results are things like stress, sleep quality, whether you’re performing the exercises effectively (i.e. in a full range of motion, contracting muscles, etc.). There is also a large genetic component, with some people being able to see results more quickly than others.

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